Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy is a must for the effective management of Type 1 diabetes. As Wikipedia notes: Patients with Type 1 diabetes depend on external insulin for their survival because the hormone is no longer produced internally. Type 1 diabetics require a base level of insulin referred to as basal insulin as well as short-acting insulin to cover meals (bolus insulin). Maintaining the correct basal and bolus rate is a continuous balancing act which requires daily management. Effective diabetes management requires regular blood sugar testing to monitor the levels of glucose in the blood. The usual schedule for checking blood glucose through fingersticks and administering insulin is before all meals, and at bedtime. Guidelines also call for a check 2 hours after the meal to ensure that the meal has been covered effectively. On average, I test my blood sugar 5-6 times per day. However, on some days that number may go as high as 9 or 10.

Blood Glucose Meter

Effective diabetes management requires regular blood sugar testing to check the levels of glucose in the blood. The usual schedule for checking blood glucose through fingersticks and administering insulin is before all meals, and at bedtime.

Guidelines also call for a check 2 hours after the meal to ensure that the meal has been covered effectively. On average, I test my blood sugar 5-6 times per day but some days that number may go as high as 9 or 10.

Insulin Injections

Type 1 diabetes can be effectively managed with Insulin Injections. The selection of insulin type and dosage/timing should be done by an experienced medical professional working closely with the diabetic patient. Administration schedule attempts to mimic the physiologic secretion of insulin by the pancreas. Typically, a long-acting insulin and a short-acting insulin are used.

When I was first diagnosed, I enjoyed a relatively brief honeymoon period where I was able to give myself one shot per day. This increased to two shots per day and as I aimed for tighter control eventually got up to three shots per day.

Blood glucose meters, diabetes test strips and insulin delivery equipment are an integral part of insulin therapy and become a part of the normal routine.

Insulin Pump

Insulin therapy can also be administered through the insulin pump. The insulin pump provides a convenient way to take insulin to cover glucose requirements. Advantage of the insulin pump include better control over the background ("basal") insulin dosage, bolus dosages calculated to the fraction of a unit, and calculators in the pump that help to determine "bolus" infusion dosages. I started on the pump more than ten years ago and have found it to be very liberating. Now, its hard for me to imagine having to rely on insulin injections to manage my diabetes.

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